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Tim Farron's Recent Appearances in Parliament

Tim Farron speaking on unaccompanied refugees (Liberal Democrat Newswire)Content supplied and updated by theyworkforyou.com

  • Nov 12, 2018:
    • Food: Production | Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs | Written Answers

      To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the food and farming sector has sufficient access to labour in order to sustain British food production (a) now and (b) in the future.

    • Social Mobility | Oral Answers to Questions - Education | Commons debates

      A huge block to social mobility is the Government's policy of forcing schools to pay the first £6,000 of costs to support children with special needs. Does the Secretary of State accept that that penalises schools for taking students with additional needs, incentivises doing the wrong thing, impoverishes those schools that do the right thing and, most of all, hurts children with special needs and their families? Will he agree fully to fund education healthcare plans?

  • Oct 31, 2018:
    • Shale Gas Development | Westminster Hall debates

      Classifying fracking rigs under the banner of permitted development is a subversion of the planning process and therefore a subversion of local democracy. Permitted development was created for conservatories, small extensions and outhouses, none of which to the best of my knowledge have ever caused an earth tremor, yet we see fracking rigs potentially being given rights under permitted development, which is a cynical disgrace.

      The subversion of the planning process works both ways, however. The proposed gas turbines at Old Hutton in my constituency are just a few hundred yards away from the local primary school. The development is just a fraction below the scale needed for national consideration. As we know, developers often do that to put pressure on a local planner, a local authority or local communities who might fear saying no because they cannot afford the cost of the appeal. When we are trying to tackle climate change and are on the cusp of catastrophic climate change, we need to ensure that all fossil fuels remain in the ground and back local authorities that oppose such things as the Old Hutton gas turbines and fracking.

  • Oct 26, 2018:
    • Mental Illness: Cumbria | Department of Health and Social Care | Written Answers

      To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 18th October 2018, to Question 178267 on Mental Illness: Cumbria, if he will publish the records for appointment requests to (a) Child and adolescent mental health services and (b) GPs for mental health related issues for under 18s in Cumbria in the format they are held.

  • Oct 24, 2018:
    • School Funding - [Mr Clive Betts in the Chair] | Westminster Hall debates

      Does the hon. Lady agree that the problem with long-term planning and wriggle room in budgets is even greater for smaller schools? In constituencies such as mine there are lots of very small, very good schools of 30 children or even fewer. If a large school has a bad period in which it has an issue with leadership, a poor Ofsted report or whatever, it can absorb the effect of getting fewer pupils as a consequence and still be able to plan ahead. However, that could be curtains for a small school, which would mean a community losing its school for good.

    • School Funding - [Mr Clive Betts in the Chair] | Westminster Hall debates

      I congratulate the hon. Lady on securing this important debate. There is an anomaly that schools that accept pupils from poorer backgrounds are rewarded and encouraged by the pupil premium that those schools attract for taking those children, but for children with additional or special needs the first 11 hours of the education, health and care plans are funded by the local school, which often places a financial burden on it. There is therefore a disincentive for schools to take on children from those backgrounds who have additional special needs.

  • Oct 23, 2018:
    • Cancer: Early Diagnosis | Health and Social Care | Commons debates

      The Secretary of State is right to say that early diagnosis provides more opportunity to cure and treat cancers. Some 60% of those treated for cancer will receive radiotherapy, and nearly every radiotherapy centre in the country has linear accelerators that are enabled to provide the advanced SABR, or stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy, technology, but Government-NHS England-contracts mean that out of the 52 centres in England no more than 20 are contracted to actually use this technology. That means that either patients are not receiving the highest quality life-saving standard of treatment that they could be or that trusts are providing it anyway but are not being paid and valuable data on mistreatment are being completely lost. Will the right hon. Gentleman order NHS England to stop this recklessness, and frankly lethal, nonsense and agree to every-

  • Oct 18, 2018:
  • Oct 17, 2018:
    • Common Land: Cumbria | Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs | Written Answers

      To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions his Department has had with (a) the Forestry Commission England, (b) Natural England and (c) the Rural Payments Agency on the mapping of the (i) number, (ii) location and (iii) expected removal date of temporary fences erected in Cumbria.

    • Cancer: Drugs | Department of Health and Social Care | Written Answers

      To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will take steps as part of the ongoing negotiations for the next Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme to ensure that increasing the number of combination treatments for cancer can be considered cost-effective and made available for patients.

    • Universal Credit | Commons debates

      One in four workers in my constituency is self-employed-obviously, they are working and contributing. Is the Secretary of State aware that the minimum income floor means that many of them will be ineligible for universal credit if they cannot pay themselves the living wage in any given month? Surely we should be encouraging self-employed people, not penalising them.

    • Universal Credit | Commons debates

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  • Oct 16, 2018: